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Displaying Available Technologies results for Imaging

ENDOENTERIC BALLOON FOR EARLY-STAGE PANCREATIC CANCER DIAGNOSIS

Technology Summary
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The success rate for the treatment of pancreatic cancer is highly dependent on early detection. However, there is currently no reliable, cost-effective way to detect pancreatic cancer at an early stage, as MRIs only produce low-resolution images that enable detection of advanced-stage cancer alone.

This invention is a catheter-mounted balloon with copper coils etched or printed on the balloon. The patient swallows the balloon into the stomach, or the balloon is placed in the GI tract by other means. Once placed, the copper coils improve the resolution of the MRI images, enabling clinicians to detect minor changes in the structure of the pancreas that may indicate the presence of cancer.


CT & MRI IMAGE RECONSTRUCTION FROM SPARSE DATA WITHOUT PRIORS

Technology Summary
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CT scans typically involve acquiring 1000+ individual x-ray images, which exposes the patient to a large amount of radiation. For younger patients, this is potentially harmful. MRI typically involves acquiring 256 individual images which takes 30 minutes to 1 hour, adding cost and leading to patient discomfort. Therefore, it is beneficial to reduce the number of images required to do a CT scan or MRI. However, fewer images leads to more image artifacts and lower resolution. Others have tried to use a numerical technique called linear interpolation to determine what is in-between the coarser layers of the reduced-image scan, but results are often not satisfactory.

This technology uses a revolutionary numerical technique called a displacement function to interpolate what is in between the coarser layers. Testing has showed it is capable of providing a higher resolution final image than the current state of the art.


3D IN VIVO VASCULAR STENT RECONSTRUCTION

Technology Summary
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Stent strut malapposition has been shown to increase the possibility of stent thrombosis, and is the cause of stent failure in up to 34 percent of stent failures. The emerging gold standard for detecting stent malapposition is optical coherence tomography (OCT). Yet, OCT imaging is unable to assess the complete area of the stent, causing clinical decision-making to be based on subjective stent size cut-off points.
University of Utah researchers have developed fully-automated software to enhance OCT imaging with diffeomorphic mapping techniques. This software enables visualization of the entire stent with high definition. Such high-resolution reconstruction allows for more precise evaluation of procedural success and the need for post-deployment interventions.